Silk & Related BioPolymers

The Yarger Research Group has been doing research in the area of molecular structure and dynamic elucidation of ‘Silk’ and related protein based biopolymers for the past 15+ years.  The group has significantly contributed to the molecular understanding of this important class of biopolymer and is working to further unlock its molecular organization and reverse engineer this material for application in the medical and advanced textile areas.

Some general ‘News & Views’ are timestamped and provided below:

High Energy X-Ray Diffraction – Fiber Diffraction – Silk – Argonne National Labs – APS – Jeff Yarger, Rob Henning and Chris Benmore.

Prof. Blamires is a collaborator of the YargerLab for several years and did part of his sabbatical at ASU in 2017. We are working on a paper entitled: “Methods for silk thread property analysis across multiple scales and structural hierarchies

Prof. Sean Blamires

Spider Silk Research Lab
Biological Sciences Building (E26)
University of New South Wales
Sydney NSW 2052

+61 450 073610

Feb. 2020

Talked with Prof. Sean Blamires (sean.blamires@unsw.edu.au) about starting up some proposals and renewing some collaborations between our groups.  Sean visited ASU a few years ago and our groups have significant overlapping interests in Silk.

Spider Silk Research Lab
Biological Sciences Building (E26)
University of New South Wales
Sydney NSW 2052

+61-2-9385-1261

https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/

PLuS Alliance 2020 Seed Grants_GUIDELINES

plus_Alliance

Feb. 2020

Interesting Webinar

Polymer_Simulation_Webinar1

Feb. 2020

Argonne Beamline proposals due SOON….

ANL_APL_Beamtime_Spring2020

January 2020

Jan 23 – BioSteel Talk and Visit.

BioSteel_Bodner_ASU_Jan2020

Jan 13-17, 2020Prof. Greg Holland’s research group coming to visit and do 800 MHz NMR Diffusion Experiments.

November 2019

Deep Look: The Curious Webspinner Insect Knits a Cozy Home: Embiid Silk. 

Article &/or Video.

Embiid3.png

ScienceNEWS: Spider webs don’t rot easily and scientists may have figured out why: Bacteria key to decomposition can’t get at the silk’s nitrogen, a nutrient needed for growth.

Spider_article_Oct2019

October 2019

Engadget: An efficient new depth sensor was inspired by spider eyesJumping spiders have super efficient depth perception.

Spider_eyes2

September 2019

ASU: BONDING EXPERIENCE: REPAIRING WOUNDS WITH GOLD, SILK AND LASERS.  Collaborative research with Prof. Rege at ASU.

Rege_ASU_Collab_Silk.png

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